Review – Gerald’s Game


When a harmless game embarked upon by a married couple turns into a fight for survival, personal demons and possibly those in the house must be confronted if anyone is to make it out alive.
Jessie (Carla Gugino) and Gerald Berlingame (Bruce Greenwood) are a married couple on a downward slope. In a bid to save their relationship, they take a weekend trip to a rural retreat and attempt to spice things up a bit. However, events take a sharp turn, and Jessie is left to fight for her life, whilst battling her own demons as well.

Last weekend, I watched one of the new Netflix Original films, Gerald’s Game. It sounded… interesting, judging by what I got from the description. However, I wasn’t prepared for what actually happened in the film. It turned out to be a good psychological thriller that proved to use once again that Netflix isn’t messing around when it comes to it’s own projects.

I think the two lead performances were really, really good, and they helped to keep the film moving along at a good pace. Carla Gugino’s character was great to watch as the film unfolded. It was really interesting to see how she portrayed the unraveling that took place for her character as time went by. Gugino completely tapped into the film’s psychological tones with her performance as her character Jessie fought with herself as well as the situation she found herself in, and this was one area the film was able to build tension well, because you never knew whether or not Jessie would have it in her to do what she needed to do in order to escape. 

Bruce Greenwood was equally wonderful to watch. There was an uneasy dynamic between his character and Gugino’s right at the start of the film, and the character that Greenwood went on to portray later on in the film totally explained that. I think he nailed the abusive and chauvinistic side of Gerald, and when paired with Gugino’s performance, it worked tremendously well. As I said, it was these two performances that made this film so watchable.

I love how this film was absolutely nothing like what I had expected it was going to be. I also loved how effectively it built tension. When somebody can make getting a glass of water a heart-stopping event, that is at sign of good storytelling, by means of both writing and directing. There were moments in this film that were similar in nature to that episode of Breaking Bad where Walter White chased a fly for an hour. It was completely deliberate and by no means an accident that such moments had such a massive impact on the rest of the film. That being said, it wasn’t just the small things this film got right. Gerald’s Game also had some pretty big moments where you could say it really took the gloves off. It struck a good balance between these two elements, which ultimately paid off.

The way the film told it’s story was very clever in my opinion. It entertained, but also contributed to so many wider meanings and topics without becoming obscure and seemingly pretentious. For a film’s narrative to be able to do both of those things well has become quite a feat of late I think.

All in all, I was quite a fan of Gerald’s Game. It did everything it needed to do and did so very well. Obviously the performances were a massive helping hand in making this film so good to watch, but the writing absolutely did it’s fair share of the work. To anybody who is contemplating watching this, I say go for it, because it is one of the better psychological thrillers to surface recently.

Review – Ozark Season 1


A financial advisor is forced to move his family to a rural community when the money of one of his firm’s clients goes missing.
For years, Marty Byrde (Jason Bateman) has led a very uneventful life. As a financial advisor stuck in a marriage on a downward slope, he has had little in the way of excitement of late. However, the life that he has been struggling to hold together is thrown into even greater disrepair when one of Marty’s clients, who just so happens to be part of a huge Mexican drug cartel, discovers some of his money has gone missing. When Marty promises to make the money back, he is forced to relocate his entire family to the Ozarks, where it would seem even more trouble awaits.

Ozark is one of the latest shows to come from Netflix, and, my word, is it a knockout. Billed as a mix of Breaking Bad and Fargo with a little bit of Jason Bateman thrown in for good measure, this certainly seemed to have all the ingredients that would make it a roaring success with Netflix users. All I can say is the ten episodes flew by, and I already very excited to see where season two takes us.

A few things occurred to me whilst I was watching this. One of those things was that Jason Bateman is brilliant. I might be jumping the gun a bit here, but I can definitely see where people were coming from when they were likening this to Breaking Bad. I was getting some serious Walter White vibes from him at times (before he became Heisenberg at least). He was doing what he was having to do for the sake of his family, and I think you always get interesting performances from people when they play a character dealing with those circumstances. Laura Linney’s character, Wendy, grew on me as the show progressed, and I think she really came into her own in the last few episodes when Wendy accepted the situation she was in and decided to take control. One of my other favourite characters was Ruth Langmore, who has a very significant part to play in the whole story. She was played by Julia Garner who really drew you in with her performance, and I’m intrigued to see how her own story plays out from here because she was so good.

I was a big fan of the story told here. I liked the idea of all the upheaval the family faced right from the off, but I also liked how it was never once plain sailing for them even after ‘settling’ in their new home. The Byrdes ruffled so many feathers when they landed, and the ripples were felt all throughout the show. What stood out for me though was the fact it wasn’t like a problem occurred, the main character solved the problem, and then a new, completely unrelated issue arose, but more the idea that new antagonists came along and the story evolved and then carried them with it. I’m not sure if that makes sense to you guys, but for me it does and I’m hoping that if you’ve seen the show, or are going to see it, you’ll find out what I mean. 

The writing that went into the show was just as good as every other aspect of it. It combined so many different things and balanced them perfectly in my opinion. There were some super intense scenes, but there was also a fair amount of dry, witty dialogue which is always a hit with me. This all helped to keep the show moving along nicely, and meant you didn’t get worn out watching it because there was some variance in the overall tempo.

On the whole, I think you should give Ozark a go. This is a show that has the potential to become yet another of Netflix’s huge hits, and I think that’s a good indicator of the kind of quality you’re getting here. If you liked Breaking Bad, which I did until they ballsed up the final season, then this is definitely a show you should pay some attention to. And if you’re just some one who likes a kind of alternative crime thriller type thing, you should also give this a watch. Ozark is going to go onto big things I reckon – jump on the bandwagon now and save yourself the task of having to catch up before everyone else has the chance to ruin for you.