Thursday Thoughts – How much power do TV audiences have?

Fox has been on something of a killing spree of late. After cancelling 5 shows in as little as 2 days, you have to question whether channel bosses will still have anything to run by the time they’re finished.

Amongst the massacred was Brooklyn Nine Nine. The decision to call time on this much-loved cop show was met with shock and outrage from fans (myself included). Cries of disbelief rang out across social media and soon these turned into campaigns to get the show back. In the space of just 36 hours, the show has died, been buried, and then was resurrected by Fox rival, NBC.

This reinstatement of the Nine Nine raises the question of how much power audiences actually possess, especially when it comes to TV shows. With films, it’s all fairly clear cut – if the film makes enough money, you tend to get a sequel, whether you asked for it or not. With TV, it’s not quite the same kettle of fish, however there is obviously a correlation between audience numbers and show survival rates as one of the most common reasons for cancelling a show is low ratings. Quality doesn’t seem to be a real deciding factor here either, which means this selection process is quite unfair. Shows that are actual works of art are take from us far too soon, while others that are tripe at best go on forever purely because there’s a larger audience watching it.

However, it would seem that there is hope for those good shows that come to an untimely end. Resurrections do happen – they have now saved two shows that I hold very close to my heart (one being B99, the other being Ripper Street). And on both occasions, these decisions have been brought about by the actions their audiences have taken, mainly in the form of kicking up one hell of a fuss about some idiot’s momentary (but HUGE) lapse in judgement.

So, TV audiences have power, but exactly how much do they have? To be honest, I’m not entirely sure what the answer is, but we definitely have a decent say in what makes the cut and what doesn’t. I don’t have the statistics for the Brooklyn Nine Nine revival handy, but I know that in the case of Ripper Street it took only 12,000 signatures on a petition to get Amazon to take the show on. In the grand scheme of things, 12,000 really isn’t a massive number either when you think about the 3.38million people that watched the show on average.

But here’s the thing – we are very spoilt for choice when it comes to what we watch on TV now. More so than ever before. There’s a lot of things to watch, but the actual audience size hasn’t increased as quickly, which in theory means that each new show and channel added stretches that audience thinner. Suddenly, 12,000 is a significant number of viewers for a channel to lose if it displeases them, and it’s also a significant number of viewers for a newer kid on the block to think about winning over. These two things coming together were ultimately what saved Ripper Street’s ass, and they will create similar dynamics in future that will save other shows. Why? Because in this world where everyone’s attention is being fought for constantly by at least 10 different entities, it’ll be the ones that give audiences what they want that come out on top. We as an audience must remember that we are the most important people to these TV stations, and also streaming platforms too. Without us, they have no purpose and therefore would cease to exist. NBC are giving the people what they want by saving Brooklyn Nine Nine, just as Amazon did when they saved Ripper Street. I do not doubt for a second that they will benefit from their decision, but regardless of however it turns out, they will be known to millions as the people who saved B99, and that kind of testimony packs a punch. And the only people who can provide that testimony are the audience, which is why they wield so much power.

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Review – The Last Kingdom (Season 2)

If you’ve been frequenting this blog for a while you may be aware that a little show called The Last Kingdom stole my attention a couple of years ago. The historical drama, which has been liked by some to a budget version of Game Of Thrones, debuted in 2015 and took a lot of people by surprise – myself included. it finally returned for it’s second season in 2017, and despite my best efforts, I’ve only recently got round to watching it.

Was it worth the wait?

Quite possibly.

The show picks up from where it left off at the end of season one with our hero Uhtred (Alexander Dreymon), continuing his mission to rescue his sister, but very quickly it becomes apparent that his energy is going to have to be focused elsewhere too. Just like with season one, the writing was superb. I’m not sure there were quite so many surprises this time around, but then i knew more about what to expect from the show, so you could say I was more prepared.

My love for our protagonist here grows with each episode I watch. I was well on-board with the character of Uhtred in season one, but I am surely smitten with him now. Bernard Cornwall, author of the novels that the show is based on, has created a character that you absolutely want to succeed no matter the cost, and Alexander Dreymon has brought those to qualities to life in such a way that I think everyone should be allowed to have an Uhtred-type figure in their lives. It seemed that this time we got to see a more human version of the character. Dreymon showed a side of Uhtred that was ruled more by his heart than by his head. The character also felt like he had matured considerably since the last time we saw him, which was also a nice development to see.

Season two also brought with it the return of a few other characters and fleshed them out more. some got better, others got worse, and my perception of these characters hinged purely on the way they treated our beloved Uhtred, funnily enough. We also got introduced to some newer faces as well, one of which I’m guessing will go on to have a pivotal role as the show progresses through future seasons.

I seemed to me that there might have been a bit more action this time around, although whether that was as violent as the last time I’m not so sure. As I said at the beginning, when the show started in 2015 it had an element of surprise about it. As a new show, I had no idea what to expect, and it pulled absolutely no punches. This time I kind of was more acquainted with the style of the show, so knew it wasn’t going to hold back as much. did this mean it lacked as much impact? In terms of shock factor, perhaps, but as I’ve said, the show felt more mature with this season, which I think made up for it.

So there you have it really, my take on The Last Kingdom season two. Definitely a good extension to what we’d seen previously, and it’s sown the seeds for what’s to come in future. Is it still one of the best British shows you could watch at the minute? Absolutely – give it a spin.

Review – Molly’s Game

A film I’ve had my eye on for a while now is Molly’s Game. This one takes a look at the life of ‘Poker Princess’ Molly Bloom, who made millions off the back of illicit poker games in LA and New York.

Well, I really liked it. Some of the thoughts I’ve seen haven’t been quite so complimentary towards this film, but while it had it’s flaws, none of these posed any major issue for me, which isn’t bad considering this is the directorial debut of Aaron Sorkin. I thought it told a great story about a woman who learned all she could about something and then made a life for herself out of it. Fair enough, as time went by, the dream fell apart a bit, but hopefully you get the gist of what I’m saying. If I’m completely honest, I personally found Molly’s Game as empowering, if not more so than Wonder Woman thanks to the film’s glorious protagonist.

Jessica Chastain is going to win an Oscar one day. Whether it’ll be for her performance as Molly Bloom, however, I’m not sure. She was delightful as the character, and I think she made it clear that the games were not about greed for Molly – at least, that wasn’t the sole motive. Chastain really humanised her and made it easy for you to not only like her, but to also admire what she achieved. I’d love to see some Academy recognition for her here, but I don’t think the film has had quite enough momentum behind it in order for her to get it.

Idris Elba actually played a blinder here as Charlie Jeffery. I say that as though I think the man’s a terrible actor – he absolutely is not. However, I don’t think he gets the same kind of quality roles on the big screen as he does on TV. With this film though, I think Elba put in what I suspect could very well be one of this year’s most underrated performances (an early shout, I know). He had some mega scenes as Charlie that showcased his talents superbly.

It was nice to see Kevin Costner back in a good film. I’ve got bit of a soft spot for the guy seeing as he played Robin Hood in one of my favourite childhood films. Him and Chastain shared one of my favourite scenes in the whole movie – one that has come under fire massively from some viewers. Yes, you have to question how he came to find Molly in New York as he did, but if you can get past that I think you can truly appreciate what a wonderful scene the two shared.

At the heart of this film is a fascinating true story. The mind boggles as to who some of the people involved in these games were. Some theories have emerged and I’ve a few suspicions of my own as to who may have taken part in Molly’s games, but part of the magic of this film is that the way it presents some of it’s characters does allow you to speculate quite a bit.

People who aren’t poker players (like myself) might fear that the film could go over their heads if it delves too deeply into the rules of the game. I didn’t find my lack of poker knowledge to be a huge disadvantage, although there was the odd scene where I got slightly lost. Nonetheless, I would urge you not to be put off if you think the same thing might happen to you – it really didn’t make much difference to my experience of the film.

I have to say that Molly’s Game is a winner for me. Chastain proves to us once again what a monster talent she is, and Elba gifts us with a dark horse performance. Both of these pair together to tell an intriguing story that held my attention from start to finish. Sorkin has done a wonderful job with his directorial debut, and I’d be very interested to see what he brings to us in future.

I watched London Has Fallen… bloody hell!


When the English prime minister dies, many of the world’s leaders gather in London to attend his funeral, only for the city come under siege from terrorists.
Following the mysterious death of British PM James Wilson, all leaders of the Western world must attend his funeral in London. Presidential bodyguard Mike Banning (Gerard Butler) sees the event as a huge risk, but President Ben Asher (Aaron Eckhart) has to go, so he must protect him. Just as predicted, the funeral goers come under fire from just about every direction and whatever plans they had for paying their respects go tits up. Many are killed, but one who is unaccounted for is the U.S. president.

I watched London Has Fallen, and it was laughably bad. The film was a cliche-ridden mess that took up almost two hours of my precious time and left me quite disappointed with a number of the actors who starred in it. I’m not entirely sure why I decided to inflict it on myself, but I did, and I’ve regretted it ever since.

If someone held a gun to my head and said I had to find one positive about this film, I’d say the cast. There are a few good actors in the film, although I do question my stance on them after seeing this. I didn’t particularly like any of the performances. All were very generic and kind of typical of every kind of film this was trying to be. I’ve come to the conclusion that Gerard Butler should do what Matthew McConaughey did around 2010 and just disappear for a few years. Let’s face it, he’s not been in anything that’s been worth watching for a long time, and given the next few films he’s going to star in, that doesn’t look like it’s going to change anytime soon. His performance as Mike Banning was cringe-worthy at best, feeling more like every impression of John McClane that has ever been done.

The story had many downfalls. Where shall I start? Well, it ripped off so many other films for a start. It was also massively unrealistic. I know this is something that could be said for most action films but just hear me out for a second. What criminal or terrorist organisation do you know of that has a video game-style supply of bad guys? There was literally no end of them throughout the whole film. There were a number of other major issues besides this one, but I’ve done my best to forget about them.

Let’s just take a moment to discuss that glorious CGI before I wrap this one up. The effects used in this film have me convinced the every element of this production was competing against each other just to see what could be crowned the worst part of it. Had the explosions and helicopter crashes been the least bit convincing, London Has Fallen might just have been slightly bearable. However, they were not, and so I must pan them like I have done almost every other part of the film.

I will not be recommending London Has Fallen to anybody anytime soon. I would say the film was shite, but I fear that would be overselling it. Why does Hollywood think that this is what the world needs? On a brighter note though, I suppose we don’t need to worry about too many more of these films coming out for now because I think they only ever get made when the world likes the leader at the heart of the story. Anyway, those are my thoughts, shared with you guys so that you don’t have to endure the same experience I did with this film.

Top Of The Lake is a top show


When a pregnant twelve year old girl seemingly tries to drown herself in a lake and then goes missing, New Zealand police must track her down and work out who the father of the baby is.
Tui Mitchum (Jacqueline Joe) is found standing in a freezing lake one morning whilst a school bus is passing. She’s taken straight to the school nurse, who is shocked to discover that Tui is pregnant. Tui is taken to the local police station where she is interviewed by Detective Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) and then taken home, only to disappear shortly after. Robin knows that time is not on Tui’s side, and nor are the weather conditions. She must fight to find Tui as soon as possible, whilst also confronting some of her own demons from her past.

Top Of The Lake is a show that felt like it took the world by storm when it first aired in 2013. There seemed to be an awful lot of people kicking up a fuss about it when it premiered on BBC2 back then. It would seem that I am quite late in only jumping on the bandwagon with this one now. However, I’ve finally watched the show, and I have to say that whilst I was quite impressed by it, I can’t quite figure out why Top Of The Lake heralded such a dramatic response from people as I thought it was good, but not exactly mind-blowing.

I liked most of the characters in the show, and I thought the performances that went into them were pretty decent. Elisabeth Moss had a fair old crack at a New Zealand accent so at least the show didn’t fall on it’s face there. She played a good part as Robin. I liked the strength she showed, but also the fragility that lay not far beneath the surface of her character. 

David Wenham played Al Parker. He was the top dog at the police station that was the hub for the investigation. There was something dodgy about him from the start, but the way Wenham played Al meant that you kind of kept coming back to the idea that he might actually be an okay guy. It was hard to gage exactly what side he was on throughout the whole series, and then things took a real turn in the final 20 minutes of the last episode that confirmed who he was was. I liked Wenham’s performance all the way through because I never really knew where I stood with his character, and I personally think that’s always a good feeling for an audience to experience.

Alongside the characters, the main story was one of the strongest elements of the show for me. There were a few twists that I think worked really well and didn’t feel as though they had just been thrown in for the sake of being there. One thing that did cause me an issue was the subplot involving the womens’ cult. That didn’t come together as well for me as some of the other subplots did. I didn’t really see where that fit into the rest of the show, and I think it could easily have been discarded. However, it didn’t detract from the rest of the show, so I won’t complain too much.

One last thing I would like to mention is the scenery. It’s something that has a place in a lot of TV and film productions that take place in New Zealand, but it’s always so beautiful. In this show, it kind of became another character as well because so much of the investigation at the heart of the story hinged on the environment. It’s not hard to see why so many films choose to shoot there because it is glorious to look at.

So, Top Of The Lake – would I recommend it? I think so. It was a good TV show – definitely one of the better ones I’ve seen on the BBC lately (let’s face it, the last few years has seen a lot of absolutely garbage come from them) – and it felt really solidly made. I do believe that China Girl, the second season, will be as good as this one. It doesn’t feel like a fluke, if that makes sense. Anyway, if you haven’t seen Top Of The Lake and have a gap in your TV schedule, give it a bash. 

The Walking Dead got off to a decent start


A sheriff wakes up from a coma to find the world in ruins after an outbreak of some sort of disease.
Whilst on duty one day, Sheriff Deputy Rick Grimes (Andrew Lincoln) is shot and left in a coma. After some time, he comes round only to find that the world has changed beyond all recognition. Something that can only be described as a zombie apocalypse has occurred, and it’s not long before he finds himself in another spot of bother. Thankfully, there are other survivors, who Rick teams up with in a bid to survive.

I’m a bit behind on this one, but I’ve just recently started watching The Walking Dead. I’ve got the first season out of the way, and so far I’m liking it. There’s a good bit of action to be had, and it’s also very funny in places. The characters that I’ve been introduced to so far have shown a lot of promise, and I’m now eager to see where things go from here.

There hasn’t really been a stand out character for me yet. Obviously we have our hero in Rick, but I think he’s fairly standard so far. I think it’s going to be interesting to see how his relationships with some of the other characters develop as there’s already some tensions growing. I think that Andrew Lincoln has presented Rick well with his performance. It’s clear that a lot of emotion is bubbling away under the surface, and so I’m definitely very interested to see where things go from here on out. Norman Reedus’ character Daryl has definitely been the most entertaining so far – I do love those loose cannon types! What I like about him is you cannot tell what he’s going to do next, which always makes for a decent amount of unpredictability. One thing for certain, however, is that there is a lot more to come with all of these characters, so I’m watching this space for now.

The story has also been set up nicely. With this being the first season, there’s not a huge amount that it really delved into, but it has created a number of possible plot lines that I’m hoping will be explored further down the line. For example, the mysterious disappearance of Merle Dixon (who I was very surprised to see was played by Michael Rooker) is one I need closure on. I don’t believe for one minute that I’ve seen or heard the last of that. Then there’s also the tensions between Rick, his missus and his old partner Shane. I’m just glad to see there’s plenty of potential for where the show could go now, and so I can’t wait to get my hands on season 2.

A big shoutout goes out to the make-up department on this show. The zombies looked good! I’ve seen a few zombie films and I think these ones have looked the best out of all of them. There was something about them that made them seem a bit more undead than the others, and the noises they made were better too. After reading a little bit about the show’s production, I discovered that there is such thing as a Walker School, which would probably explain why these zombies were a cut above the rest.

All in all, my first experience of The Walking Dead has been a good one. This pilot season has set up the seasons to come very well, and there’s been enough hints given regarding what sort of things might be to come to capture my attention for a while long yet. I’m interested to see how the characters and their relationships develop, and to see who else they gather along the way. All I have to do now is find myself a copy of season 2 on DVD…

This film ain’t Filth


A corrupt, drug addicted cop with mental health issues attempts to beat his colleagues to a promotion in a bid to win back his wife and daughter.
Bruce Robertson (James McAvoy) is a bent copper who is up for a promotion, and he will stop at nothing to ensure he gets it. One by one, he singles out his competition and finds a way he can get them all to jeopardise their chances of success. The reason for his desperation to come out on top is that his wife and daughter left him, and he believes that this is the way to win them back. However, slowly but surely, all the secrets he’s exposing come back to haunt him, and Bruce risks losing himself in the web he’s spun.

Filth is a film that has been on my radar for a while. I remember reading rave reviews when it came out, and a lot of people I know have really enjoyed it. It made me laugh a lot, and while I wasn’t entirely sure what exactly to make of the film for the first half, by the time it had finished, I was very happy I’d watched it.

Where is James McAvoy’s Oscar at? Not only for this film, but for a few he’s been in. He’s a wicked actor, and quickly becoming a favourite of mine. He was phenomenal as Bruce, and it was evident where some of the inspiration for his role(s) in Split had come from. I loved how unhinged he was. You never knew what was coming next, and I think this made his performance so much more authentic than if he’d have been down all the time. His energy levels varied constantly and it really was brilliant to watch. McAvoy headed up a really great cast, actually. He was joined by Imogen Poots, Emun Elliott, Gary Lewis, Jim Broadbent, and a favourite of mine from Ray Donovan, Eddie Marsan. Altogether, it was a knockout line-up that made for a bunch of performances that were terrific to watch.

The humour that is heavily drizzled all over this film is very funny and very dark, which is another reason I enjoyed the film so much. There were countless times I couldn’t breathe for laughing that hard. It was exactly my sense of humour (which if you didn’t know involves getting the giggles over a lot of things that a person really shouldn’t get the giggles over), and it was fairly unrelenting. There never seemed to be a very long dry spell in between the laughs, and even then the drama or the story thrived anyway. The actual narrative was one that was quite interesting, and I think it made a few little twists and turns that I can’t say I saw coming. It also combined all the things that were tormenting Bruce and was able to present them to you in a way where it all kind of came to head at same time as it did for our protagonist. This is a film that has been very well done, and I can see now why a lot of people loved it so much.

On the whole, I can only recommend Filth to you. It was a very dark comedy with a bit of the more dramatic material thrown in for good measure. The two elements came together in a way that I think has been the best I’ve seen in a while, striking a good balance in an intriguing story that is told by an awesome lead performance. If you’re yet to see this, do something about that as soon as you can, because as far as I’m concerned, you’re missing out.