Review – The Meg

I don’t remember the last time I went to the cinema to watch a film with no expectation other than the fact that I was going to have about two hours of mindless fun.

Or at least I couldn’t until it came to The Meg.

I’m not going to lie to you – I got very excited when I found out Jason Statham was going to be taking on a big-ass shark this summer. What better calling was there for this guy? He lives to make films like this. He’s not fussed about Oscars, he just wants to make action flicks that entertain people, and with The Meg, he’s achieved that goal once again.

The first half hour gives you all the background and sets the scene. Admittedly, you do find yourself thinking at this point, “Hurry up and show me what I came to see.” Patience, however, is a virtue, and you do very quickly start to get rewarded once that initial phase of the film is over.

What comes next is everything you could ever have hoped this Statham vs shark movie would deliver and more. You get the big-ass shark. You get the even bigger-ass shark eating that shark, up-ending a boat in the process. Ridiculous action movie heroics and near-misses that are way too convenient for the sake of a paper thin plot that you just willingly accept because you, some way, somehow, have allowed yourself to fall hook, line and sinker for this film. It shouldn’t work, but it does. Personally I felt it could have been improved with the addition of a lot more truly terrible one-liners, however I’ll forgive the writers this mis-step due to them allowing Statham the greatest line of the whole film. Tell me one person who the words “CHOMP ON THIS YOU UGLY BASTARD”, were better suited to. The reason that man was put on this earth was to deliver that line to us.

Now, it could be argued that the only reason The Meg hasn’t been ripped a new one is because of who the lead star is. When Jason Statham is involved in a film, suddenly people become more accepting of the fact that the film isn’t, and was never destined to win Oscars; that it will not represent art in the traditional way we know it. As a result, audiences are a lot more open-minded about what the film may contain, and The Meg gets away with murder.

However, let’s take Statham out of the mix for a second and give the film some serious credit where it’s due. This film has got one of the most diverse casts that I have seen in a while in what is a now a big summer blockbuster. Regardless of how well-received it is at the box office (which has been very well so far by the looks of things), no one can deny that there is a real mixed bunch of actors from all kinds of different background involved, and that was great to see.

If you want a couple of hours to just switch your brain off and enjoy a tonne of madness then it’d be worth popping in to your local cinema and feasting your eyes on The Meg. Very little mental capacity is required to enjoy this one – in fact, the less you go in with, the more fun this will be for you. It’s a film that know exactly what it is, and doesn’t once shy away from it. It’s probably going to be one of the best cinema trips I’ll have this year, and I am completely okay with that, and I really hope that we get to see some kind of a franchise come from this because I’m all ready to do the same thing all over again this time next year.

Review – London Has Fallen


When the English prime minister dies, many of the world’s leaders gather in London to attend his funeral, only for the city come under siege from terrorists.
Following the mysterious death of British PM James Wilson, all leaders of the Western world must attend his funeral in London. Presidential bodyguard Mike Banning (Gerard Butler) sees the event as a huge risk, but President Ben Asher (Aaron Eckhart) has to go, so he must protect him. Just as predicted, the funeral goers come under fire from just about every direction and whatever plans they had for paying their respects go tits up. Many are killed, but one who is unaccounted for is the U.S. president.

I watched London Has Fallen, and it was laughably bad. The film was a cliche-ridden mess that took up almost two hours of my precious time and left me quite disappointed with a number of the actors who starred in it. I’m not entirely sure why I decided to inflict it on myself, but I did, and I’ve regretted it ever since.

If someone held a gun to my head and said I had to find one positive about this film, I’d say the cast. There are a few good actors in the film, although I do question my stance on them after seeing this. I didn’t particularly like any of the performances. All were very generic and kind of typical of every kind of film this was trying to be. I’ve come to the conclusion that Gerard Butler should do what Matthew McConaughey did around 2010 and just disappear for a few years. Let’s face it, he’s not been in anything that’s been worth watching for a long time, and given the next few films he’s going to star in, that doesn’t look like it’s going to change anytime soon. His performance as Mike Banning was cringe-worthy at best, feeling more like every impression of John McClane that has ever been done.

The story had many downfalls. Where shall I start? Well, it ripped off so many other films for a start. It was also massively unrealistic. I know this is something that could be said for most action films but just hear me out for a second. What criminal or terrorist organisation do you know of that has a video game-style supply of bad guys? There was literally no end of them throughout the whole film. There were a number of other major issues besides this one, but I’ve done my best to forget about them.

Let’s just take a moment to discuss that glorious CGI before I wrap this one up. The effects used in this film have me convinced the every element of this production was competing against each other just to see what could be crowned the worst part of it. Had the explosions and helicopter crashes been the least bit convincing, London Has Fallen might just have been slightly bearable. However, they were not, and so I must pan them like I have done almost every other part of the film.

I will not be recommending London Has Fallen to anybody anytime soon. I would say the film was shite, but I fear that would be overselling it. Why does Hollywood think that this is what the world needs? On a brighter note though, I suppose we don’t need to worry about too many more of these films coming out for now because I think they only ever get made when the world likes the leader at the heart of the story. Anyway, those are my thoughts, shared with you guys so that you don’t have to endure the same experience I did with this film.

Review – American Assassin

Following a terrorist attack on a beach, a civilian decides to take action against those behind the incident.

When Mitch Rapp (Dylan O’Brien) proposes to his girlfriend whilst on holiday at a beach resort, he didn’t anticipate the engagement being cut horrendously short by a terrorist attack in which almost everyone on the beach was injured or killed. In the months following the attack, Mitch decides that he wants sweet revenge. He puts himself in position to make a move on the man behind the attack that killed his loved one, only to be interrupted by U.S. armed forces just before he’s about to strike. He is held in custody before being referred to Stan Hurley (Michael Keaton), the man in charge of training individuals who are to involved in Black-Ops style missions. The men prove themselves to be a real match for each other, and it’s not long before the two are going out on their first operation together to put a stop to an ex-trainee of Hurley’s wicked ways.

I was quite excited about American Assassin. On the surface it looked like it was going to be a great action film that could potentially have been the making of Dylan O’Brien in slightly more grown-up cinema. Now I’ve seen it I have to be honest and say it wasn’t as good as I’d hoped it would be, but that it was worth seeing nonetheless, and I do think it my have succeeded in helping the lead shed some of those more adolescent roles.

I do think Dylan O’Brien did a good job with his performance. He made the change that occurred in Mitch following the beach attack so easy to spot, and I think this was something that was of utmost importance to the role. It was the single motivation behind his character, so the amount of emphasis placed on it by O’Brien’s performance and the story itself was key, and I feel like this was one thing the film got bang on.

Michael Keaton clearly had fun with his role as Stan Hurley. It was good to see him revelling in the part he was playing. He was as tough as old boots on the surface, but deep down there was a man who had feelings and who was having his own issues, especially with the nature of the mission he was embarking on now. Basically there was quite a lot more to his character than you were initially greeted with as a viewer. I think the combination of his and O’Brien’s character worked really well, and was a dynamic that lifted the film considerably as they both complimented each other.

There was some really good explosive action in this film, which was nice because I don’t think we really get enough of these films where the action is one of the main events. Obviously we’ve had some good action comedies such as The Nice Guys, and some off-kilter action thrillers in the form of The Accountant and Baby Driver lately, but it’s been a while since we’ve had a half decent serious action film. For that reason, I enjoyed the film because it didn’t hold back at all, especially during a torture scene that had quite a few people in the cinema cringing (pulling fingernails off does that to people I think). It’s also been a while since I’ve seen an opening scene that was as intense as the one here in a film that didn’t venture off into some next-level obscurity.

Despite everything I’ve just said, however, I have to be honest and say that I felt as though something was missing, or there was just something about it that meant it didn’t quite manage to join the greats of the genre for me. I’m glad I watched the film, and it definitely is something I would have watched at some point because of the type of film it was, but I can’t say that I’d rush to watch it again. It was just a bit too generic for me to go screaming from the rooftops about it, you know? It took quite a formulaic approach in the way it told the story and did a bit messy at one point about halfway through where I’ve still not 100% figured out what happened.

Overall, American Assassin is a solid film that I think adequately fulfils the need some of us were starting to have for a serious action flick that didn’t leave a terrible taste in our mouths. It was great to watch the dynamic between O’Brien and Keaton, and the action was full-throttle. It’s just a shame it couldn’t have been slightly more original, but hey, you can’t have everything all the time.

Review – Kingsman: The Golden Circle

When an attack wipes out nearly all of Kingsman, those left behind must join forces with another similar organisation in order to catch the culprits.
After Kingsman HQ is destroyed, Eggsy (Taron Egerton) and Merlin (Mark Strong) have to call upon some extra help to find those behind the attack. Introducing Statesman, a sister organisation to Kingsman based in the U.S. They head over there, and it’s not long before they a few surprising discoveries. First of all, they find Harry Hart (Colin Firth) alive and fairly well. They also learn that there’s a new criminal mastermind holding the world hostage, and, of course, it is their job to put a stop to that. The two sides come together in an effort to save the world, and remain wonderfully stylish throughout.
Kingsman: The Golden Circle, a film we’ve all been looking forward to for quite some time, has finally arrived. Was it worth the wait? I’d say so. I thoroughly enjoyed my time watching it. It had all the fun and flair the first film had, and then some, plus a few extra bonuses as well.
I love Taron Egerton. I just think he’s lovely. He always looks so good as Eggsy, and he’s really great in the role. I think he nails the working class elements of his character, especially when it comes to many of the funnier moments in the film. It probably sounds really stupid but I love how he makes you believe his character has never forgotten where he’s come from. There’s a level of integrity that always shines through and it’s just a really nice thing to see.
All the other characters and performances were just as much fun the second time round. This goes for those we’d met before, plus those we were only just introduced to. Julianne Moore was a great villain as Poppy, and in all fairness, she had a point with what she was saying about the drugs industry. I thought the person she gave her character was brilliant because she seemed so sweet and innocent but really she was just… deranged. Her character was well in keeping with the Kingsman style and she was a great addition to the cast.
Some people have complained about how over-the-top this film turned out to be. The whole point of Kingsman is to basically just rip all those spy films that have taken themselves too seriously over the years to shreds. It is a spoof franchise, and if you can’t go overboard in this case then when can you? The reason I love these films, and why so many others do is because they’re super loud, ferociously entertaining, and everyone involved – whether that’s the actors, the film crew or the audience – has tremendous fun with them. Look at Elton John, for God’s sake. How brilliant was he? I’d said prior to the film that I hoped we’d see the Tiaras And Tantrums version of him in the film and I was not wrong. He was easily one the best things in this because he clearly embraced it and just totally got into it. I walked out of the cinema just thinking what a lad he was for throwing himself into the film with such gusto. I was well impressed!
The action was 10x bigger in this second outing, and as you might have gathered by now, I was all for it. The fight sequences looked amazing every time, and I fully appreciate the amount of choreography that must have gone into each one. They were just something I’d sit in awe of whenever they happened, and they definitely are one of the things that make the Kingsman films so special for me.
All in all, I have to recommend The Golden Circle. It was a fantastic watch, especially on the big screen I saw it on. The characters were brilliant, and the action was as gloriously OTT as I had hoped it would be. The cheeky comedy laced throughout was also wonderful, and Elton John was exactly who I wanted him to be in the film. I’d definitely say you need to see this film is you’re a fan of the first film. Ignore what some people are saying because this is terrific fun that is not to be missed.

Review – Ripper Street Full Series Review


London Metropolitan’s H Division turns to solving crimes in the wake of the Jack The Ripper killings.
When Jack The Ripper took to the streets of Whitechapel in the late 1800s, it was up to the men serving a particular police force to hunt the perpetrator down and put the fears of the public to rest. However, while The Ripper may have disappeared seemingly without a trace one day, his crimes were set to haunt London for a long time to come. The trio dealing with the aftermath are Inspector Edmund Reid (Matthew MacFadyen), Sergeant Bennet Drake (Jerome Flynn) and police surgeon Captain Homer Jackson (Adam Rothenberg), who all have their own personal struggles on top of the work they do by day.   

So, my favourite show, Ripper Street, came to an end this week. The last ever episode of the programme aired on Monday night, and I have to be honest I don’t think there has ever been a more bittersweet ending to a TV show from my point of view. Even now, almost a week after watching the finale, I’m still not entirely sure how to take it.

Ripper Street first came onto our screens back in 2012. The first season introduced us to the three main characters who would quickly grow on viewers. One by one, each character had his secrets revealed, and then developed upon as the seasons progressed. In the driving seat is Matthew MacFadyen as Edmund Reid, the main protagonist of the show. The writer’s of the show really put Reid through the mill, and MacFadyen had to run with these trials and tribulations whilst maintaining his character’s core values, which I think he did very well. What I really liked about MacFadyen’s performance was that he always showed Reid had immense integrity. No matter what state he was in during the show, Reid was always very true to himself; he always did what he believed was the right thing to do for himself at any given time. His actions may not always have been the good thing to do, or, as the show progressed, the lawful thing to do, but for Reid they were always the right thing, and that sort of conviction he had.

After Reid, you have Jerome Flynn as loyal sidekick Bennet Drake, whose promotion in later seasons causes ructions that never really disappear. This character, along with any character in this show who ends up being of any significance, could be talked about for hours if I was to sit next do a full in-depth study of him. I think of the three leads here, Flynn’s character was the most complex, and I personally think that it is he who best personifies the kind of Whitechapel in which this show is set.

Now we move onto one of my favourite characters, Captain Homer Jackson, or Matthew Judge if we are to use his real name. I absolutely loved Adam Rothenberg’s interpretation of Jackson. He was tremendous throughout the whole show, and I believe I can safely say that he had one standout moment in each and every episode. Rothenberg was gifted some of the greatest lines in the script, and followed this up by delivering them perfectly every time. Without a doubt, it was he who gained most of my affection, with his glorious one-liners and sometimes wise words. That and the fact that he was probably the character with the best heart of all of them.

While these three were largely the staples of the entire series, there were also a number of series regulars. MyAnna Buring played Long Susan Hart, or Caitlyn Swift, and was also a favourite of mine because of the kind of woman she portrayed. She was unconventional for the time, a woman elbowing her way into a man’s world, and watching her in each and every episode was wonderful. She possessed all the qualities that made Gal Gadot’s Wonder Woman so fantastic, but for a female character such as this to appear in a period piece was an added bonus.

Before I move onto anything else, I must point out that life for these characters was not a bed of roses. This, of course, was caused by numerous villains who cropped up from season to season. Now, while each season had a stand-out antagonist, the series itself did have an overall winner in the bad guy department. This has to be Jedediah Shine, played by the phenomenal Joseph Mawle. This guy made a prolonged appearance in both seasons two and five, and he just got worse and worse as time went by, and for someone like myself who is rather partial to a good villain, this was great to see. The performance put in by Mawle was on another level entirely, and he definitely deserves more recognition for the part than I think he has received. He actually made my skin crawl, and to watch him made me feel a whole range of emotions, which I think is a good sign.

Now we can finally move onto something other than the characters and the actors who played them. Ripper Street is kind of a hybrid of a formula show and those with a continuous narrative for their entire series run. For the most part, there was a new crime to be solved each week, but there were also a number of threads that ran through and connected each episode.I’m a fan of this approach because there is always something to bring you back to the next episode, but each week also has new life injected into it by the latest case the team are set to solve. What I also loved about the story is the fact that Jack The Ripper always seemed to have a presence. Ultimately, it was his crimes that haunted H Division, and gave Reid his motives, and so while the show was not directly about him, despite what the name suggests, The Ripper did have a very important part to play throughout the whole show.

Besides Ripper himself, there were other continuous threads that spanned the length of the series, and as far as I’m aware, none of them had happy endings, which I’m glad about because for life to have worked out to be a bed of roses for all the characters would not have been fitting for the show. Of course, having spent four or five seasons following thee characters, when their time came it was a rough moment in the show. I think these ends were handled very well, and whilst different for each character, every one of them was brutal. For me, this showed perfectly the capabilities of the writers for the show, who clearly knew that they didn’t need to make every character a martyr for the audience to feel the full impact of their demise.

That being said, one thing I do think was butchered was the show’s finale, but even that comes with a caveat (and the story of how this show came to be so significant to me). Ripper Street came to end long before this fifth and final season was in the pipeline. After ratings dropped during season two, the BBC cancelled the show, and there was a huge outcry from the fans, including myself. Petitions were created, and letters were written (still perhaps the finest bit of writing I’ve ever done if I’m honest), and after realising what a major cock-up they had made, BBC looked to continue the show with another network in a co-production deal. Eventually, Amazon took the show on, and split the budget with the BBC, but the episodes released on Amazon had to be trimmed down before they were shown on TV so as to not disrupt the schedules. Ultimately this meant that that there were scenes cut from the version of the show that I’ve seen, which now brings me back to the series finale. According to Amazon subscribers, the final episode was cut to ribbons before being shown on TV, which is potentially why it felt as flat as it did, so I can’t completely attack it for that. However, I can say that had I have been in charge of the writing and had decided to kill off all the other main characters, or take them out of the game in some way, Edmund Reid would also have been dead by the end of it. I wouldn’t have had him murdered, but he would have succumbed to some sort of illness or death by natural causes because come the series’ end, he had nothing left to live for, you know? His life’s work was more or less complete; the only thing left unfinished was the actual Jack The Ripper case, which I personally would have liked to have seen slowly cause him to lose his sanity, or compromise his health in some way that led to him dying. It just didn’t feel right that it finished the way it did, with him sat back at his desk without any of the people closest to him beside him.

Anyway, I think I should probably stop whittling on now, at 1,500 words I’ve taken up enough of your time and hardly scratched the surface of the show. I think I may do individual reviews of each season at some point in the future because there is so much more I’d like to cover, such as the different characters from season to season and the relationships between them all, the different stories that took hold and the wonderful sets and costumes as well. What I’ll say is if you have seen Ripper Street, get in touch and let me know what you think of it, and if you haven’t, please do give it a go. You might think there have been some spoilers here but I really don’t think they’d ruin the show at all. As you can probably see, I cannot recommend Ripper Street enough – it’s a show that grabbed me right at the start and never let go, and I think it is one of those shows that has shown the power of good TV and also the power of the fans too. This was a fantastic show, and I’m sad to see it go, but I’ll never tire of rewatching the box sets, which is a true sign of the magic Ripper Street possesses.

Review – Baby Driver


A coerced getaway driver finds himself caught up in a heist that is doomed to fail.
For a while, Baby (Ansel Elgort) has been the getaway driver of choice for Doc (Kevin Spacey), who considers him a lucky charm. Baby has undertaken a series of jobs which have all been successful, with little interference from the law. However, he didn’t get into that line of work by choice, and with his debts almost paid off, it’s not long before Baby will be a free man. Unfortunately though, the true nature of the contract he entered into with Doc soon becomes clear when Baby is called out of retirement, and the life of his new-found love, Debora (Lily James), is threatened. With this at stake, Baby agrees to take on a heist with Buddy (Jon Hamm), Darling (Eiza González) and Bats (Jamie Foxx), and it is set to be the biggest job ever pulled off, meaning the risks are higher than ever before too.

Set to be possibly THE biggest blockbuster of the summer, if not this year, is Edgar Wright’s latest project, Baby Driver. There has been a lot of buzz surrounding this film, with the hype reaching it’s peak this week. All I can say is this film is a real crowd pleaser – there is something for everyone dotted throughout the action, the comedy and the teensy-weensy bit of romance, so I cannot recommend it enough. However, I must say that this conclusion was only reached based largely upon the second half of the film purely because that was the part of the film I was fully tuned into due to an incident that occurred at the start of the film (but we won’t go into that because this is a review of the film, not of my experience at the cinema). All I’ll say is if you don’t feel I’m doing the film complete justice with this review, please forgive me.

The mix of characters in the film is brilliant. There’s a number of different personalities that make every scene in the film enjoyable to watch. I have to be honest and say that I didn’t find Baby to be the most exciting character in the film, but I found that in the scenes where he really came alive, Ansel Elgort nailed the performance. Kevin Spacey is Kevin Spacey, so you know his character is going to be wonderful to watch anyway, and he fully delivered as Doc, who I likened to Joe Cabot in Reservoir Dogs with the way he planned the jobs and kept everyone in check. Jamie Foxx also did as was expected of him as Bats, who waded in with a considerable amount of ego. Surprisingly enough, I also was quite a fan of Lily James’ character, who clearly was prepared to do anything for Baby. My favourite character has to be Buddy though, who was brought to us by the delightful Jon Hamm. People may or may not know by now, but I love a good villain, and he ended up being just that. 

There are some huge chase scenes to be found throughout Baby Driver (as you’d perhaps hope), and I know for a fact that there was definitely one that lasted for the best part of five minutes where I sat forward in my chair, mouth wide open, holding my breath with my eyes glued to the screen. It was fantastic! That, of course, wasn’t the only chase in the film, but for me it was the most memorable, and most certainly the one that got the adrenaline flowing.

Edgar Wright has done a very good job with this film. As I said to start with, this will suit the broadest of audiences because it is such a mixed bag. Personally, I think the highlights were the perfectly choreographed chase scenes (yep, those again) and the more comedic moments that also frequented the film. It was genuinely very funny in a number of places in a way that I think would survive multiple watches. Such a mixture kept the film feeling fresh for the entirety of it’s duration, so watching it didn’t feel like a huge endeavour, and the time flew by.

All in all, I can only side with those people who are tipping this to be one of the films of the year. Baby Driver proved to be a highly entertaining ride, even after the situation that occurred at the beginning which we shall not speak of. I may have to have a second viewing of the film in order to get the full experience and in order to provide you with a review that will give a truer reflection of what I thought. In the meantime, all I can say is you should probably seriously consider seeing Baby Driver at some point before it leaves cinemas, although I think it’ll get a good run given the majorly positive response it has received.

Tuesday Top Ten – My Favourite Bruce Willis Films

This Sunday just gone, it was Bruce Willis’ birthday, so what better time for me to take a look back on some of my favourite films of his? It was tough narrowing this list down if I’m honest – I’ve seen a few too many Bruce Willis films in the last few years. Trimming the shortlist from 25 to 10 was hard, but I got there eventually.
10. Split


Fair enough, this maybe wouldn’t be considered a Willis film by most, but the way I see it is he appeared in it, so it counts. So far this year, this has probably been my favourite mainstream film to come out, however because it’s not really a Willis film, I couldn’t put it any higher.

9. The Jackal


This film is a guilty pleasure of mine, and it is one of my favourites by Brucie. For me, there’s a few plus points with The Jackal, not least Richard Gere’s god-awful Irish accent – I think he would have given Brad Pitt a run for his money in Snatch. I find it to be a fun watch, even if it is considered to be rather terrible my a lot of people.

8. Over The Hedge


This Dreamworks animation is one I always enjoy watching. Willis plays RJ, and isn’t exactly a good guy, but isn’t quite a supervillain either. While they’re never equal to the quality of Pixar’s early years, I do like Dreamworks films for the fact that they push their innuendos and disguised adult humour a bit further than most kids’ films.

7. Twelve Monkeys


This was a film that I really enjoyed for the first half, maybe even the first three quarters of it’s runtime, however it was after this point that it lost me entirely. Willis may have been the lead in the film, but it was Brad Pitt who was terrific here, and he was the reason I stuck with the whole thing to the end.

6. Die Hard With A Vengeance


This third instalment in the franchise is my favourite after the original. I loved the partnership between Willis and Samuel L. Jackson, which is a pairing that will feature more than once on this list. There are a number of scenes in this film that really make me laugh, but also there was plenty of action to go with them.

5. Lucky Number Slevin


I liked this film, but it was nothing special. I watched Tarantino-esque Lucky Number Slevin a few years ago and just thought it tried a bit too hard to be something it wasn’t. Nonetheless, it was a bit of fun and I’m glad I watched it.

4. Sin City


Sin City was a film that I also watched a few years ago and enjoyed, although to this day I’m still not entirely sure what actually went on throughout the story. Willis played a key character here in the form of Hartigan and was his usual wonderful self as a grizzled law enforcer. The man knows what he’s good at, and he’s reasonably good at sticking to it.

3. Unbreakable


I remember when I first watched Unbreakable, I don’t think I was overly impressed by it – I enjoyed it, but was singing from the rooftops about it. Looking back however, I can appreciate it far more. It is a brilliant film that I am planning to revisit very soon, and was also part of the reason why I enjoyed Split so much.

2. Pulp Fiction


Of course Tarantino’s best known film had to feature here somewhere. Willis’ role as Butch Coolidge here was brilliant, and in a line up of some really great characters, he completely held his own.

1. Die Hard


It would have been sacrilege to not put Die Hard at number one in a list of my favourite Bruce Willis films. This will always be known as the film that made him into a huge action star, and also the film that raised the bar for the action genre. 

So that’s all ten of my favourite Bruce Willis films. I enjoyed each and every one of them for different reasons, as I also did with many of the films that didn’t make the list. What would you include that I didn’t? Let me know via the comments below.